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Lice Infestation (Pediculosis)

What is Lice Infestation?

Lice infestation is a condition where tiny insects called lice live on the skin, hair, or clothing of a person and feed on their blood. Lice can cause itching, irritation, and sometimes infections. Lice can be spread by close contact with an infested person or by sharing personal items such as hats, combs, or towels. There are different types of lice that affect different parts of the body, such as head lice, body lice, and pubic lice.

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What are the signs and symptoms of Lice Infestation?

Some of the signs and symptoms of lice infestation are:

  • Intense itching on the scalp, body or in the genital area. This is an allergic reaction to louse bites.
  • A tickling feeling from movement of hair. This is caused by the lice crawling on the skin or hair.
  • The presence of lice on the scalp, body, clothing, or pubic or other body hair. Adult lice may be about the size of a sesame seed or slightly larger. They are tan or grayish in color and avoid light.
  • Lice eggs (nits) on hair shafts. Nits are tiny, oval-shaped eggs that stick to hair shafts near the scalp. They may be white, yellow, or brown in color and may look like dandruff, but they cannot be easily brushed out of hair.
  • Sores on the scalp, neck and shoulders. Scratching can lead to small red bumps that may sometimes get infected with bacteria.
  • Bite marks, especially around the waist, groin, upper thighs and pubic area. These are caused by the lice feeding on blood from the skin.

What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Lice Infestation?

Some of the treatments that are available at the dermatologist for lice infestation are:

  • Prescription shampoos or lotions that contain different ingredients than the over-the-counter products. These may include malathion, benzyl alcohol, or spinosad. These products are applied to the hair and scalp and left for a certain amount of time before rinsing. They may be more effective against lice that are resistant to other treatments.
  • Oral prescription drug such as ivermectin. This is a tablet that is taken by mouth and kills lice by affecting their nervous system. It is usually given in two doses, eight days apart. This drug is typically used when other treatments have not been effective or when there is a widespread infestation.
  • Manual removal of lice and nits. This involves using a fine-tooth comb or a special device to comb through the hair and remove the lice and their eggs. This method can be time-consuming and tedious, but it can be done at home or with the help of a professional. Manual removal may be necessary in addition to other treatments, especially for pubic lice or eyelash lice.
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FAQ About Lice Infestation

How is lice infestation diagnosed?

Lice infestation is diagnosed by examining the hair and scalp for nits, nymphs (immature lice), or adult lice. A fine-toothed comb or a special device may be used to comb through the hair and remove the lice and nits. A magnifying glass or a microscope may be needed to see the lice or nits clearlySometimes, a skin scraping or a hair sample may be taken and sent to a laboratory for confirmation.

Is lice infestation a sign of poor hygiene or an unclean environment?

  •  No. Lice infestation is not a sign of poor hygiene or an unclean environment. Anyone can get lice regardless of their personal cleanliness or living conditions. Lice are not attracted to dirt or grease, but to human blood. Lice can infest people of any age, gender, race, or socioeconomic status.

Can lice infestation affect other animals or pets?

No. Lice are species-specific, meaning they only infest humans and do not affect other animals or pets. Lice cannot be transmitted from animals to humans or vice versa.

Can lice infestation be cured?

Yes. Lice infestation can be cured with proper treatment and prevention measures. However, it may take some time and effort to get rid of all the lice and nits from the hair and the environment. It is important to follow the instructions for the treatment carefully and to repeat the treatment after 7 to 10 days to kill any newly hatched lice. It is also important to check the hair and scalp regularly for signs of reinfestation and to treat it promptly if needed.

 

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for Lice Infestation?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for Lice Infestation to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Rubella (German Measles)

    What is Rubella?

    Rubella is a contagious disease caused by a virus that can cause a red rash on the skin, fever, sore throat, and swollen lymph nodes. It is also known as German measles or three-day measles. Rubella is usually mild, but it can cause serious problems for unborn babies if their mothers get infected during pregnancy. 

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    What are the signs and symptoms of Rubella?

    The signs and symptoms of rubella are usually mild and may include a red rash, fever, headache, runny nose, red eyes, swollen lymph nodes, joint pain, and general discomfort. Some people may not have any symptoms at all. The rash typically starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body, and lasts for about three days. The symptoms usually appear two to three weeks after exposure to the virus.

    What are the causes of Rubella?

    • Rubella is caused by a virus that can be spread through direct contact with the saliva or mucus of an infected person, or through the air by respiratory droplets from coughing or sneezing.
    • Humans are the only known host of the rubella virus.
    • Rubella can also be transmitted from a pregnant woman to her unborn baby, which can result in serious birth defects or fetal death.

    FAQ About Rubella

    How is rubella transmitted?

    The rubella virus is transmitted by airborne droplets when infected people sneeze or cough. Humans are the only known host. Rubella can also be transmitted from a pregnant woman to her unborn baby, which can result in serious birth defects or fetal death.

    How is rubella diagnosed?

    Rubella can be diagnosed by a blood test that detects antibodies to the virus. A positive test indicates either a current or past infection. A negative test indicates that the person is susceptible to rubella and should be vaccinatedRubella can also be confirmed by isolating the virus from a throat swab or urine sample.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for Rubella?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for Rubella to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Scarlet Fever

    What is Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is an infection that stems from the Group A Streptococcus (“strep”) bacteria. One of its hallmark signs is a rash with a texture resembling sandpaper, accompanied by other related symptoms. This condition typically follows a strep infection in the throat, commonly known as strep pharyngitis or strep throat, although it can also occur after a strep skin infection. The rash observed in scarlet fever is a result of a toxin produced by the strep bacteria.

    In the past, scarlet fever used to be prevalent among children aged 2 to 10; however, it has become relatively uncommon nowadays. The reasons for this shift remain unknown, particularly considering that there hasn’t been a decrease in the incidence of strep throat or strep skin infections.

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    What are the signs and symptoms of Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is typically set off by an infection in the throat caused by strep bacteria. This leads to the emergence of the following symptoms:

    • Fever and shivering
    • Headache
    • Throat that is red and painful
    • Enlarged tonsils
    • Lymph nodes in the neck that are swollen (often called “swollen glands”)

    Around 12 to 48 hours after these symptoms manifest, the characteristic rash of scarlet fever begins. This rash is vividly red, akin to sunburn, and it frequently possesses a delicate texture resembling sandpaper or goosebumps. Initially, it tends to appear in areas like the underarms, groin, and neck, subsequently spreading to the torso, back, arms, and legs. Additional symptoms of scarlet fever encompass:

    • A lightened area encircling the mouth
    • A white-coated tongue with red dots (referred to as white strawberry tongue)
    • A red strawberry tongue or raspberry tongue, which arises when the white coating on the tongue sheds and reveals a red surface with red dots
    • Darkened or reddened skin creases, particularly noticeable in the elbow’s bend, referred to as Pastia’s lines

    Occasionally, scarlet fever follows a skin infection caused by streptococcus bacteria, such as infections in burns, wounds, or impetigo. In these instances, the rash and associated skin symptoms materialize, but there are no concurrent symptoms linked to strep throat.

    What are the causes of Scarlet Fever

    Scarlet fever is caused by a type of bacteria called Group A streptococcus (Group A strep), which can also cause strep throat. Sometimes, the bacteria produce a toxin that makes the skin turn red and bumpy. This is what causes the rash of scarlet feverScarlet fever is contagious and can spread through contact with an infected person or their respiratory droplets.

    FAQ About Scarlet Fever

    How is scarlet fever transmitted?

    Scarlet fever is highly contagious and can spread through respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes of an infected person. It can also be contracted by touching surfaces or objects contaminated with the bacteria.

    How is scarlet fever spread?

    Scarlet fever is spread by contact with an infected person or their respiratory droplets. 

    Is scarlet fever contagious?

    Yes, scarlet fever is contagious. It can spread from person to person until 24 hours after starting antibiotics.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for Scarlet Fever?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for Scarlet Fever to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Necrotizing Fasciitis

    What is Necrotizing Fasciitis (Flesh-eating Bacteria)

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but serious bacterial infection that causes the death of the skin and underlying tissues. It can affect any part of the body, but it is more common in the limbs, genitals, and abdomen. It can spread quickly and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. The symptoms include severe pain, fever, redness, swelling, blisters, and black spots on the skin. The bacteria that cause necrotizing fasciitis usually enter the body through a wound or injury. People with weak immune systems, diabetes, obesity, alcoholism, or drug abuse are more at risk of getting this infection. The diagnosis is based on the symptoms, medical imaging, and tissue biopsy. The treatment involves surgery to remove the infected tissue, antibiotics to kill the bacteria, and supportive care to prevent complications.

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    What are the signs and symptoms of Necrotizing Fasciitis

    The signs and symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis can vary depending on the stage and severity of the infection. According to the sources I found, some of the common signs and symptoms are:

    • A red, warm, or swollen area of skin that spreads quickly
    • Severe pain, including pain beyond the area of the skin that is red, warm, or swollen
    • Fever
    • Ulcers, blisters, or black spots on the skin
    • Changes in the color of the skin
    • Flulike symptoms, such as body aches, sore throat, nausea, diarrhea, and chills

    What are the causes of Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but serious bacterial infection that causes the death of the skin and underlying tissues. It can be caused by different types of bacteria, but the most common cause is group A Streptococcus (GAS), also known as “flesh-eating bacteria”GAS bacteria usually enter the body through a break in the skin, such as a cut, scrape, burn, insect bite, puncture wound, or surgical woundOther types of bacteria that can cause necrotizing fasciitis include Vibrio vulnificus, which live in water, and Staphylococcus aureus, which can cause staph infections. These bacteria can also enter the body through wounds or injuries. People with weak immune systems, diabetes, obesity, alcoholism, or drug abuse are more at risk of getting this infection. Necrotizing fasciitis can spread quickly and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. The symptoms include severe pain, fever, redness, swelling, blisters, and black spots on the skinThe diagnosis is based on the symptoms, medical imaging, and tissue biopsyThe treatment involves surgery to remove the infected tissue, antibiotics to kill the bacteria, and supportive care to prevent complications.

    FAQ About Necrotizing Fasciitis

    How is necrotizing fasciitis diagnosed?

    The diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is based on the symptoms, medical imaging, and tissue biopsy. However, diagnosis can be difficult and acting fast is key. Delayed diagnosis and treatment can increase the risk of death and amputation.

    Who is at risk of getting necrotizing fasciitis?

    People with weak immune systems, diabetes, obesity, alcoholism, or drug abuse are more at risk of getting this infection. Other risk factors include cancer, pregnancy, chronic kidney disease, peripheral vascular disease, and malnutrition.

    What are the complications of necrotizing fasciitis?

    Necrotizing fasciitis can cause serious complications such as sepsis (a life-threatening response to infection), shock (a sudden drop in blood pressure), organ failure (when one or more organs stop working properly), gangrene (when tissue dies due to lack of blood flow), scarring (permanent marks on the skin), disfigurement (changes in appearance), and disability (loss of function or ability).

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for Necrotizing Fasciitis?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for Necrotizing Fasciitis to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Measles

    What is Measles

    Measles is a viral infection that affects the respiratory system and causes a red, itchy rash on the skin. It is very contagious and can spread through the air or by direct contact with an infected person. Measles can be prevented by getting vaccinated and can be treated with supportive care and medication to ease the symptoms.

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    What are the signs and symptoms of Measles

    The signs and symptoms of measles are:

    • High fever, usually above 104°F (40°C), that lasts for four to seven days.
    • Cough, runny nose, sore throat, and inflamed eyes (conjunctivitis).
    • Tiny white spots with bluish-white centers on a red background inside the mouth, also called Koplik’s spots.
    • A red, blotchy rash that starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body over several days

    Measles Complications and Risk Factors for Severe Illness

    Measles is a viral infection that can cause serious and sometimes fatal complications, especially in children and people with weak immune systems. 

    Some of the common complications of measles are:

    • Otitis media: An ear infection that can cause pain, fever, and hearing loss.
    • Bronchopneumonia: A lung infection that can cause cough, difficulty breathing, and chest pain.
    • Laryngotracheobronchitis: An inflammation of the voice box, windpipe, and airways that can cause hoarseness, wheezing, and breathing problems.
    • Diarrhea: A condition that can cause dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and weight loss.
    • Encephalitis: A brain inflammation that can cause seizures, coma, and permanent brain damage.
    • Blindness: A result of eye damage from measles virus or secondary infections.
    • Death: A result of severe complications or organ failure.

    Some of the risk factors for developing severe illness from measles are:

    • Age: Children under 5 years and adults over 20 years are more likely to have complications from measles.
    • Malnutrition: People who are undernourished or lack vitamin A are more prone to measles infections and complications.
    • Immune status: People who have weakened immune systems due to HIV/AIDS, cancer, organ transplant, or other conditions are more susceptible to measles and its complications.
    • Vaccination status: People who are unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated against measles are at higher risk of getting infected and having complications.
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    FAQ About Measles

    How do you get measles?

    You can get measles if you are exposed to the measles virus, which is normally passed through respiratory droplets when an infected person sneezes, coughs, or talks.

    How is measles diagnosed?

    Measles can be diagnosed by a blood test or by examining the rash and other signs.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for Measles?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for Measles to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Cutaneous Anthrax

    What is Cutaneous Anthrax? 

    Cutaneous anthrax is a type of anthrax infection that affects the skin and tissue around the site of infection. It is caused by a spore-forming bacterium called Bacillus anthracis. It usually enters the body through a cut or scrape on the skin when a person handles infected animals or contaminated animal products. Cutaneous anthrax is the most common and least dangerous form of anthrax, and it can be treated with antibiotics.

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    What are the signs and symptoms of  Cutaneous Anthrax?

    The signs and symptoms of cutaneous anthrax are:

    • A group of small blisters or bumps that may itch
    • Swelling around the sore
    • A painless skin sore (ulcer) with a black center that appears after the small blisters or bumps

     

    What are some of the causes of Cutaneous Anthrax?

    Some of the causes of cutaneous anthrax are:

    • Exposure to infected domestic or wild grazing animals or their products, such as wool, hides, or hair.
    • Contact with anthrax spores that enter the body through a cut or scrape on the skin.
    • Biological weapons that release anthrax spores in powder or spray form. However, this is very rare and there has not been an anthrax attack in the United States since 2001.

    What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Cutaneous Anthrax?

    The treatments available at the dermatologist for cutaneous anthrax are mainly antibiotics and antitoxins. Antibiotics are used to kill the anthrax bacteria and prevent them from multiplying and spreading in the body. Antitoxins are used to neutralize the toxins produced by the anthrax bacteria that cause severe illness. Some of the antibiotics that can be used for cutaneous anthrax are ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, and amoxicillinSome of the antitoxins that can be used for inhalation anthrax are raxibacumab and obiltoxaximab. These medications are given in addition to antibiotics and are available to doctors through the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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    FAQ About Cutaneous Anthrax

    How is cutaneous anthrax diagnosed?

     The preferred diagnostic procedure for cutaneous anthrax is staining the ulcer exudate with methylene blue or Giemsa stain, which can differentiate Bacillus anthracis from other bacteria.

    How common is cutaneous anthrax?

    Cutaneous anthrax is the most common form of anthrax infection, accounting for more than 95% of cases worldwide.

    Is cutaneous anthrax contagious?

    There is no evidence that cutaneous anthrax is transmitted from person to person, but it is possible that anthrax skin lesions may be contagious through direct contact or through contact with a contaminated object (fomite). Therefore, it is advisable to avoid touching or sharing personal items with someone who has cutaneous anthrax.

    What are the risk factors for cutaneous anthrax?

    The risk factors for cutaneous anthrax include exposure to infected domestic or wild grazing animals or their products, such as wool, hides, or hair; contact with anthrax spores that enter the body through a cut or scrape on the skin; and biological weapons that release anthrax spores in powder or spray form.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for Cutaneous Anthrax?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for Cutaneous Anthrax to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Athlete’s Foot

    What is Athlete’s Foot?

    Athlete’s foot is a fungal skin infection that usually affects the area between the toes. It can cause itching, burning, scaling, peeling, and sometimes blisters on the feet. It is contagious and can spread through contact with infected skin or surfaces. Athlete’s foot can be treated with antifungal medications, but it may recur if not prevented.

    athletes-foot

    What are the signs and symptoms of Athlete’s Foot?

    Some of the signs and symptoms of athlete’s foot are:

    • Itching, stinging, and burning between your toes or on the soles of your feet.
    • Scaly, peeling, or cracked skin between the toes, on the bottom of the foot, or on the heel.
    • Blisters on your feet that itch or ooze fluid.
    • Thickened, crumbly, or discolored toenails (in rare cases).

    What are the causes of Athlete’s Foot?

    The causes of athlete’s foot are fungal infections that grow on the skin of the feet. The fungi that cause athlete’s foot are called dermatophytes. They can be spread through direct contact with someone who has the infection, or by touching surfaces that are contaminated with the fungi, such as towels, floors, and shoesThe fungi thrive in warm, moist environments, such as locker rooms, showers, and swimming poolsPeople who sweat a lot, wear tight shoes, or have minor skin injuries on their feet are more likely to get athlete’s foot.

    What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Athlete’s Foot?

    Some of the treatments that are available at the dermatologist for athlete’s foot are:

    • Prescription-strength cream or ointment, such as clotrimazole (Lotrisone), econazole (Ecoza, Spectazole) or ciclopirox (Loprox, Penlac).
    • Prescription antifungal pills, such as terbinafine (Lamisil) or itraconazole (Sporanox, Tolsura).
    • Prescription antifungal cleanser, powder or lotion.
    • Prescription antifungal drugs to prevent recurrence of severe cases.

    These treatments are usually more effective than over-the-counter products and can clear up the infection faster. However, they may also have more side effects and interactions with other medications. You should consult your dermatologist before starting any treatment for athlete’s foot.

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    Athlete’s Foot: Myths and Facts

    • Myth: Only athletes can get athlete’s foot.
    • Fact: Anyone who is exposed to the fungus that causes athlete’s foot can get infected. The fungus likes to grow in warm, moist environments, such as locker rooms, showers, and swimming pools.
    • Myth: Athlete’s foot is the same as jock itch.
    • Fact: Athlete’s foot and jock itch are caused by the same type of fungus (dermatophytes), but they affect different parts of the body. Athlete’s foot affects the feet, while jock itch affects the groin area.
    • Myth: Showering regularly can prevent athlete’s foot.
    • Fact: Showering alone won’t prevent athlete’s foot. You need to dry your feet completely after each shower and avoid sharing towels, socks, or shoes with someone who has athlete’s foot. You should also wear shoes that allow your feet to breathe and change your socks often if you sweat a lot .

    FAQ About Athlete’s Foot

    Who is at risk of getting athlete’s foot?

    Anyone who is exposed to the fungus that causes athlete’s foot can get infected. However, it most commonly affects men and people over the age of 60. You may be more likely to develop athlete’s foot if you have diabetes, obesity, a weakened immune system, tissue damage or wounds on your feet.

    Is athlete’s foot contagious?

    Yes, athlete’s foot is contagious and can spread through direct contact with an infected person or indirect contact with contaminated surfaces or objects. You can also spread it from your feet to other parts of your body, especially if you scratch or pick the infected area.

    Can I get athlete’s foot from my pet?

    Yes, you can get athlete’s foot from your pet if they have a fungal infection on their skin or nails. The same fungus that causes ringworm in animals can also cause athlete’s foot in humans. You should avoid touching your pet’s infected area and wash your hands after handling them. You should also take your pet to the vet for treatment.

    Can I wear nail polish if I have athlete’s foot?

    It is not advisable to wear nail polish if you have athlete’s foot because it can trap moisture and create a favorable environment for the fungus to grow. Nail polish can also prevent the medication from reaching the infected area and interfere with the healing process. You should remove any nail polish from your toenails before starting treatment for athlete’s foot.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for athlete’s foot?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for Athlete’s Foot to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Intertrigo

    What is Intertrigo?

    Intertrigo is a skin condition that occurs when skin rubs against skin, causing friction, inflammation, and sometimes infection. It usually affects the areas where the skin folds, such as the armpits, groin, under the breasts, or between the toes. It can cause a red or reddish-brown rash with small bumps or spots, itching, burning, stinging, or pain in the affected areasIntertrigo is not contagious, but it can be worsened by bacteria, fungi, or viruses that grow in the warm and moist environment of the skin foldsIntertrigo can be treated with topical or oral medications, barrier ointments, drying solutions, and lifestyle changes.

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    What are the causes of Intertrigo?

    Some of the causes of intertrigo are:

    • Moisture and heat in the skin folds, which create an ideal environment for bacteria and fungi to grow.
    • Sweat, urine, feces, or saliva, which can irritate the skin and increase the risk of infection.
    • Obesity, diabetes, or poor hygiene, which can make the skin folds more prone to intertrigo.
    • Certain medications, such as chemotherapy drugs, which can weaken the immune system and make the skin more sensitive.
    • Other skin conditions, such as psoriasis, eczema, or seborrheic dermatitis, which can increase the inflammation and itching in the skin folds.

    What are the signs and symptoms of Intertrigo?

    Intertrigo is a skin condition that occurs when skin rubs against skin, causing friction, inflammation, and sometimes infection. Some of the signs and symptoms of intertrigo are:

    • A red or reddish-brown rash with small bumps or spots in the areas where the skin folds, such as the armpits, groin, under the breasts, or between the toes.
    • Itching, burning, stinging, or pain in the affected areas.
    • The rash may be symmetrical (appearing on both sides of the skin fold) or asymmetrical (appearing on one side only).
    • The rash may be wet and soft (macerated) or dry and scaly.
    • The rash may have plaques (raised, scaly lesions), papules (small bumps), or pustules (pimple-like bumps) if there is a fungal or bacterial infection.

    How to Help Prevent Intertrigo

    Here are some ways to help prevent intertrigo:

    • Keep skin folds clean and dry: Wipe away sweat and other bodily fluids regularly and use a clean, dry cloth to dry the affected area thoroughly.

    • Wear loose-fitting clothing: Tight clothing can trap moisture and create a breeding ground for bacteria and fungi, so it’s important to wear loose-fitting, breathable clothing.

    • Avoid synthetic fibers: Synthetic fibers trap heat and moisture, so opt for natural fibers such as cotton when choosing clothing.

    • Use antifungal powder: Dusting antifungal powder in skin folds can help prevent the growth of yeast and other fungi.

    • Maintain a healthy weight: Excess weight can create more skin folds and increase the risk of intertrigo.

    • Keep skin folds aired out: Allowing skin folds to air out regularly can help prevent intertrigo by reducing moisture levels.

    • Avoid skin-on-skin contact: Avoiding skin-on-skin contact in skin folds can help prevent friction and reduce the risk of intertrigo.

    • Practice good hygiene: Regularly bathing and using soap to clean skin folds can help reduce bacteria and fungus levels.

    Remember, if you experience symptoms of intertrigo, it’s important to seek treatment as soon as possible to prevent complications.

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    FAQ About Intertrigo

    Who is at risk of developing intertrigo?

    Individuals who are overweight, have skin folds due to obesity, or suffer from excessive sweating are at a higher risk of developing intertrigo.

    How is intertrigo diagnosed?

    Intertrigo is diagnosed through a physical examination of the affected skin folds.

    What are the complications of intertrigo?

    Complications of intertrigo include bacterial or fungal infections, which can cause a worsening of symptoms.

    Is intertrigo contagious?

    Intertrigo is not contagious, but it can be spread to other skin folds if not properly treated.

    Can intertrigo be cured permanently?

    While intertrigo can be managed and treated, it may not be cured permanently in some individuals who are prone to skin irritation in skin folds.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for intertrigo?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for intertrigo to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Molluscum Contagiosum

    What is Molluscum Contagiosum?

    Most often seen in children, molluscum contagiosum is a common viral infection. This virus affects the outer layer of skin and does not usually move through the body. The firm, skin-colored bumps that develop from molluscum contagiosum usually disappear within a year on their own but doctors often recommend treatment to keep the virus from spreading. Molluscum contagiosum can appear in adults and, if it involves the genitals in the adult cases, it is considered a sexually transmitted disease. People with weakened immune systems are more susceptible to the virus as well.

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    What are the signs and symptoms of Molluscum Contagiosum?

    Generally, molluscum contagiosum produces little white, pink or flesh-colored bumps that have a dimple or pit in the center. In most people, the growths range in size from about two to five millimeters in diameter. Molluscum contagiosum often appears on the face, neck, abdomen, arms, legs, or genitalia.

    What are the causes of Molluscum Contagiosum?

    The molluscum contagiosum virus, a member of the poxvirus family, enters your skin through hair follicles, pores, or abrasions on the skin’s surface. Highly contagious, the virus spreads by person-to-person contact, sexual contact with an infected partner, or through contact with contaminated objects like toys, door knobs, or faucets. Scratching, rubbing and shaving the papules can spread the virus to other areas of skin.

    What treatments are available at the dermatologist for Molluscum Contagiosum?

    Your doctor will need to destroy the infection-causing cores inside the papules. Once this core is destroyed, the infection will heal. Several methods can be utilized to eliminate these cores:

    • Chemical agents to remove the infected skin
    • Cryotherapy to freeze the areas and kill the infection
    • Curette, scalpel, or other cutting device to surgically remove them
    • Lasers to destroy the infected cells
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    FAQ About Molluscum Contagiosum

    Is molluscum contagiosum contagious?

    Yes, molluscum contagiosum is contagious until all the bumps have gone away. The virus can be spread from one part of the body to another or from one person to another through direct contact with the bumps or objects that have touched them.

    Is molluscum contagiosum dangerous?

    No, molluscum contagiosum is not dangerous in most cases. It is a mild and harmless infection that does not cause serious complications. However, it can cause discomfort, embarrassment, or anxiety for some people. It can also interfere with sexual pleasure or intimacy. In rare cases, it can cause secondary infections, eye problems, or widespread lesions in people with weakened immune systems.

    Can molluscum contagiosum recur?

    Yes, molluscum contagiosum can recur if a person is exposed to the virus again. The infection does not provide immunity against future infections. Therefore, it is possible to get molluscum contagiosum more than once in a lifetime.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for molluscum contagiosum?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for molluscum contagiosum to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Impetigo

    What is Impetigo?

    A highly contagious skin infection, impetigo usually develops in infants and children although anyone can contract the infection. The most common occurrences of impetigo happen during the summer and early fall. Usually, impetigo is caused by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (staph) or Group A streptococcus (strep). Bacteria can live harmlessly on the body because the skin normally acts as a barrier to infection. If you have cuts and abrasions, these bacteria can enter the skin and produce impetigo which begins as small patches of blisters.

    You contract impetigo either by coming in contact with someone that has the infection or when open sores cannot heal as in the cases that develop on the mouths and noses of young children. Impetigo spreads easily and thrives in environments like daycares and schools.

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    What are the causes of Impetigo?

    Impetigo is caused by bacterial infections, typically Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The bacteria can enter the skin through cuts, scrapes, or other skin lesions and multiply, leading to the development of impetigo. Impetigo is highly contagious and can spread easily through close contact with infected individuals or by sharing towels, clothing, or other personal items that have come into contact with the bacteria.

    Factors that increase the risk of developing impetigo include:

    • A weakened immune system
    • Crowded living conditions, such as in schools or daycare centers
    • Poor hygiene
    • Skin injuries, cuts, or abrasions
    • Humid or warm weather
    • Eczema or other skin conditions that cause dry, itchy skin.

    It’s important to seek prompt treatment for impetigo to avoid spreading the infection and to prevent complications such as scarring or secondary skin infections.

    What are the symtpoms of Impetigo?

    The symptoms of impetigo typically include:

    • Blisters or sores that can be red, yellow, or honey-colored and filled with fluid.
    • Itching or burning skin around the affected area.
    • Redness and swelling around the affected area.
    • Crusting over of the blisters or sores.
    • Formation of new blisters or sores.

    It’s important to see a dermatologist if you experience any of these symptoms, as impetigo is a highly contagious skin infection that requires prompt treatment to prevent the spread of the bacteria and avoid potential complications.

    What treatments are available for Impetigo?

    The main treatment for impetigo is antibiotics, either in topical or oral form, to kill the bacteria causing the infection. Treatment options may include:

    • Topical antibiotics: Antibiotic creams or ointments applied directly to the affected area can help clear up the infection.

    • Oral antibiotics: Antibiotics taken by mouth may be prescribed for more severe cases of impetigo or when the infection has spread beyond a localized area.

    • Antiseptic care: Keeping the affected area clean and dry and using antiseptic creams or ointments can help promote healing and prevent the spread of the infection.

    In addition to antibiotics, it’s important to practice good hygiene, such as washing hands regularly and keeping wounds covered, to prevent the spread of impetigo and reduce the risk of reinfection.

    If you experience symptoms of impetigo, it’s important to see a dermatologist for proper diagnosis and treatment. 

    FAQ About Impetigo

    Is impetigo contagious?

    Yes, impetigo is highly contagious and can spread easily through close contact with infected individuals or by sharing personal items that have come into contact with the bacteria.

    Can impetigo leave scars?

    In some cases, impetigo can cause scarring, especially if the sores are not treated promptly or if the infection spreads to surrounding skin.

    When should I see a dermatologist for impetigo?

    You should see a dermatologist if you experience symptoms of impetigo or if you have been in close contact with someone who has the infection. Early treatment can help prevent the spread of the bacteria and reduce the risk of complications.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for impetigo?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for impetigo to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Boils

    What are Boils?

    Also called solar lentigines, age spots refer to the brownish areas that appear over time on your face and body. Age spots occur as a result of overexposure to the sun. Often seen on people over 40, anyone can have age spots.

    Usually, age spots do not cause any problems and do not require medical care. If the spots are especially dark or have changed in appearance, have your physician exam them to make sure there is no risk of skin cancer. After a visual inspection, your doctor can determine if the area needs to be biopsied.

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    What causes Boils?

    Factors that can increase the risk of developing boils include:

    • Poor hygiene: Poor hygiene practices can increase the risk of skin infections, including boils.
    • Weak immune system: People with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS, diabetes, or other medical conditions, are more susceptible to skin infections, including boils.
    • Crowded living conditions: Crowded living conditions, such as in schools, prisons, and military barracks, can increase the risk of spreading skin infections, including boils.
    • Skin conditions: Certain skin conditions, such as eczema, can increase the risk of developing boils.
    • Using shared personal items: Sharing personal items, such as towels or razors, can increase the risk of spreading skin infections, including boils.
    • Poor nutrition: Poor nutrition, especially a lack of vitamin C, can weaken the immune system and increase the risk of skin infections, including boils.

    What are the symptoms of Boils?

    The symptoms of a boil typically include:

    • Painful, red, and swollen bump: A boil is a tender, red, and swollen bump that develops under the skin.
    • Pus-filled head: Over time, the boil will develop a yellow or white pus-filled head.
    • Pain or discomfort: Boils can cause pain or discomfort, especially when they are touched or pressed.
    • Increased size: Boils can grow larger over time as the infection spreads deeper into the skin.
    • Fever: In some cases, a person with a boil may develop a fever as the body fights off the infection.
    • Swelling: Boils can cause swelling in the affected area, making it difficult to move or use the affected limb.

    What treatments are available for Boils?

    The following treatments may be used to treat boils:

    • Drainage: The pus from the boil will need to be drained to allow it to heal. Your doctor may use a sterile needle or scalpel to make an opening in the boil, allowing the pus to drain out.
    • Antibiotics: In some cases, antibiotics may be prescribed to help clear the infection. This is especially true if the boil is caused by a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection.
    • Warm compresses: Applying warm compresses to the affected area can help increase blood flow and speed up the healing process.
    • Pain relief: Over-the-counter pain medications, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, can help relieve pain and discomfort associated with boils.
    • Incision and drainage: If the boil is large or if it’s not draining on its own, your doctor may need to make an incision and drain the pus to prevent the infection from spreading.

    It’s important to seek prompt medical attention if you develop a boil, as untreated boils can spread and cause serious infections. Your doctor can help determine the best course of treatment based on your symptoms and medical history.

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    How to Help Prevent Boils

    There are several steps you can take to help prevent boils:

    • Practice good hygiene: Wash your hands frequently, especially after using the bathroom or before preparing food. Shower regularly and keep your skin clean and dry.
    • Avoid sharing personal items: Do not share towels, razors, or other personal items that can spread bacteria.
    • Keep cuts and scrapes clean: If you have a cut or scrape, clean it with soap and water and cover it with a bandage until it heals.
    • Avoid tight clothing: Wear loose-fitting clothing, especially in warm, moist areas where bacteria can thrive.
    • Treat skin conditions: If you have eczema or another skin condition that can increase your risk of developing boils, follow your doctor’s instructions for treatment.
    • Eat a balanced diet: A balanced diet, including adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals, can help keep your immune system strong and reduce your risk of skin infections, including boils.
    • Keep your skin healthy: Moisturize your skin and avoid using harsh soaps or other skin care products that can irritate the skin and increase your risk of developing boils.

    By following these steps and seeking prompt medical attention if you develop a boil, you can help prevent boils and reduce the risk of serious infections.

    FAQ About Boils

    How are boils diagnosed?

    Boils are typically diagnosed based on a physical exam, during which your doctor will examine the affected area and ask about your symptoms. In some cases, a sample of the pus may be taken for laboratory analysis to identify the underlying cause of the infection.

    Can boils spread to other parts of the body?

    Boils can spread to other parts of the body if the infection is not properly treated. In some cases, the bacteria can enter the bloodstream and cause a serious, life-threatening infection.

    How long do boils last?

    Boils can last anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the severity of the infection and the effectiveness of the treatment.

    Can boils recur?

    Boils can recur, especially if the underlying cause of the infection is not treated or if you have a weakened immune system.

    When should you see a dermatologist for a boil?

    You should see a dermatologist if you develop a boil, especially if it’s large or painful, or if you have a weakened immune system or other underlying medical condition that increases your risk of serious infections.  The dermatologist can help determine the best course of treatment based on your symptoms and medical history.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for boils?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for boils to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

    Candidiasis

    What is Candidiasis?

    Candidiasis, commonly known as a yeast infection, is caused by an overgrowth of Candida, a type of yeast normally found on the skin, mucous membranes, and in the digestive tract. When conditions favor its proliferation, Candida can lead to infections in various body parts. These infections include oral thrush (mouth and throat), vaginal yeast infections (genital area), and skin-related issues like redness and itching. Symptoms vary depending on the location of the infection.

    Treatment typically involves antifungal medications, either applied topically or taken orally. Candidiasis can affect anyone, especially when the immune system is compromised or the body’s microbial balance is disrupted. Seeking medical advice is important for proper diagnosis and effective management, especially in cases of recurrent or severe infections.

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    What are the causes of Candidiasis?

    Candidiasis is caused by an overgrowth of Candida, a type of yeast that is normally present in small amounts on the skin, mucous membranes, and in the digestive tract. Several factors can contribute to this overgrowth, leading to the development of Candidiasis:
     

    • Weakened Immune System: A compromised immune system due to conditions such as HIV/AIDS, certain medications (e.g., steroids or immunosuppressants), or other illnesses can create an environment where Candida can thrive.

    • Antibiotics: Antibiotic use can disrupt the balance of microorganisms in the body, including beneficial bacteria that help control Candida growth, potentially allowing Candida to overgrow.

    • Hormonal Changes: Hormonal fluctuations, such as those occurring during pregnancy, menstruation, or menopause, can make the body more susceptible to Candidiasis.

    • Diabetes: Poorly controlled diabetes can lead to elevated levels of sugar in bodily fluids, providing an ideal environment for Candida to multiply.

    • High Sugar Diet: Diets high in sugar and refined carbohydrates can promote the growth of Candida, as yeast feeds on sugar.

    • Weakened Skin Barrier: Skin damage, cuts, or abrasions can create openings for Candida to enter the body and cause infections.

    • Humid Environments: Warm and moist areas of the body, such as skin folds, provide a conducive environment for Candida to thrive.

    • Tight or Non-Breathable Clothing: Wearing tight or non-breathable clothing can create a warm, damp environment that promotes Candida growth.

    • Sexual Activity: Sexual activity can sometimes introduce Candida into the genital area, leading to infections like vaginal yeast infections.

    • Use of Corticosteroids: Long-term use of corticosteroid medications can weaken the immune system and increase the risk of Candidiasis.

    • Medical Procedures: Certain medical procedures, such as catheter insertion or oral devices, can introduce Candida to the body and lead to infection.

    Types of Candidiasis

    The most common forms of Candidiasis are:

    • Thrush
      An oral yeast infection, thrush shows redness, cracking or white patches in the mouth
    • Cutaneous
      Patches of red, raw skin that develops in creases, like under the breasts, belly or groin; itching may also occur
    • Vaginitis
      Yeast infection in the vagina that is often accompanied by cottage-cheese like discharge, pain and burning
    • Esophagitis
      Located in the esophagus, this yeast infection may cause painful swallowing and chest pains

    Symptoms

    Depending on the area affected, signs of Candidiasis vary and may include:

    • Burning
    • Difficulty swallowing
    • Irritation
    • Itching
    • Soreness
    • Redness
    • White skin lesions

    Some patients experience no symptoms at all.

    What treatments are available for Candidiasis?

    Treatment options for Candidiasis vary depending on the location and severity of the infection. Here are some common treatment approaches:

     

    • Antifungal Medications: Topical antifungal creams, ointments, or suppositories are often used to treat localized Candidiasis, such as vaginal yeast infections or oral thrush. Over-the-counter or prescription options are available.
    • Oral Antifungal Medications: For more widespread or severe infections, oral antifungal medications may be prescribed. These medications work systemically to target the underlying fungal overgrowth.
    • Prescription-Strength Creams: In cases of cutaneous candidiasis (skin infections), your doctor may prescribe stronger antifungal creams or ointments to apply to the affected area.
    • Antifungal Tablets or Capsules: Certain types of Candidiasis, such as esophagitis or systemic infections, may require oral antifungal tablets or capsules for effective treatment.
    • Home Remedies: Some individuals may find relief from mild cases of Candidiasis using natural remedies like yogurt, garlic, or coconut oil. However, these remedies may not be as effective as medical treatments and should be discussed with a healthcare provider.
    • Addressing Underlying Conditions: Treating underlying conditions that contribute to Candidiasis, such as diabetes or immune system disorders, can help prevent recurrence.
    • Lifestyle and Hygiene: Maintaining good hygiene, wearing breathable clothing, and avoiding irritants can help prevent and manage Candidiasis.
    • Dietary Changes: Some people may benefit from reducing sugar and refined carbohydrate intake, as Candida thrives on sugar. A balanced diet can help support overall health and immune function.
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    FAQ About Candidiasis

    Can Candidiasis affect men as well as women?

    Yes, Candidiasis can affect both men and women. While vaginal yeast infections are more common in women, men can develop genital yeast infections (balanitis) or other forms of Candidiasis on the skin or mouth.

    Candidiasis contagious? Can it be spread through physical contact?

    Candidiasis is not usually considered contagious. It is caused by the body’s own yeast overgrowth and is not transmitted through casual physical contact. However, in rare cases, it may be possible to spread Candida through intimate contact.

    Can Candidiasis lead to complications if left untreated?

    Yes, untreated Candidiasis can potentially lead to complications. In some cases, the infection can spread, causing more discomfort and affecting different areas of the body. Severe or recurring infections may also indicate underlying health issues.

    Are there any specific risk factors that make someone more susceptible to recurrent Candidiasis?

    Certain factors such as frequent antibiotic use, weakened immune system, uncontrolled diabetes, or hormonal changes can increase the risk of recurrent Candidiasis.

    Can stress or emotional factors contribute to the development of Candidiasis?

    While stress alone may not directly cause Candidiasis, it can weaken the immune system, making the body more susceptible to infections, including Candida overgrowth.

    Is there a link between Candidiasis and other health conditions, such as allergies or autoimmune disorders?

    Some studies suggest a potential connection between Candidiasis and allergies/autoimmune conditions, but more research is needed to establish a definitive link.

    Can Candidiasis affect children, and what are the common manifestations in pediatric cases?

    Yes, Candidiasis can affect children. Common manifestations in children include diaper rash (diaper dermatitis) and oral thrush (white patches in the mouth).

    Is it possible for Candidiasis to occur internally, affecting organs other than the mouth, genitals, or skin?

    Yes, Candidiasis can affect internal organs in individuals with weakened immune systems, leading to conditions like invasive candidiasis, which may affect the bloodstream, heart, or other organs.

    How does Candidiasis in the nailbeds (onychomycosis) differ from other types of fungal nail infections?

    Onychomycosis caused by Candida can be similar to other fungal nail infections, but it may require different treatment approaches. Candida-related onychomycosis can often cause a white or yellow discoloration of the nails.

    Is there a dermatologist near me in New Orleans that offers treatment for Candidiasis?

    Yes. At our New Orleans dermatology office we offer treatment for Candidiasis to patients from New Orleans and the surrounding area. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment.